Buying your equipment from us is a long term investment. We understand that, and try to make products of the best quality.

Unfortunately, from time to time, we receive feedback from our customers that the equipment has spoiled in a short period of time (within 6 months). We asked some quick questions, and popped in to take a look to observe. After investigations, we believe these tips will help all gym owners extend the lifespan of their equipment.

Educate your users

We saw someone using a technique bar, loaded it with 30kg on each side, and started doing deadlifts. The technique bar is not meant for this purpose, and it will spoil the bar very quickly. A sign will help them understand the uses of different bars. 

We also saw someone forcing the barbell to a corner of the gym, loading 5 plates on the other side and proceeded to do rows on the barbell. Obviously, this places a lot of pressure on one end of the bar and will damage it. A landmine will help solve this issue rather than using this method. A landmine is cheap, a barbell isn’t.

Please don't do this.
Please don't do this. Get a landmine.

Treat your equipment with care

Doing Olympic weightlifting? Then please make sure the bar does not hit anything on its descent. The bar is made of steel, not adamantium.

Doing deadlifting? If you belong to the school of thought that it is ok to drop the bar at the top, then please use a majority of bumper plates before using cast iron plates. Again, the bearings in the barbell is not indestructible, and constant impact of non-shock absorbing metal plates on the barbell will increase the wear and tear, and eventually, the barbell will not be able to spin smoothly.

Yes, we know the workout bench may be light, but holding it with one hand will cause immense pressure on the other side and lead to higher wear and tear of the bench.

The question to ask the memebrs are: Would you do this if the equipment belonged to you? If not, why are you doing this? 

Maintain your equipment

Overtime, the nuts and bolts will be loose. Regularly tightening them will prevent them from excess movement, or wearing out the threads on the nuts. 

Do you see the stitching coming out? Use a nail or a screw and reattach it back quickly. By leaving it not repaired, the small hole will become an immense one, and before you know it, the entire foam will pop out of the bench. 


Above all, simply applying some level of common sense and teaching your members to treat the equipment with respect, and your equipment will last for a much longer time.